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The Lord is my rock
and my hair has still got lichen in it
from leaning on Him.
The Lord is my fortress
and my deliverer.

My God is my rock
and I climb onto my favourite
resting place and snooze.
The Lord is my stronghold
and my salvation.

The Lord is my rock
and I tell Him I love Him out loud
because what else is there to say?

The Lord is my rock
and as no other hugs are available
the embrace of a rock will do.

The sheep know my voice by now
but they still aren’t sure.

The buzzard sits in the grass
socially distanced by a mere 6 feet.

The Lord is my rock
and the blessing of my God
kisses the land.
The Lord is my shield
and the wind is an echo of love.

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Sh’ma

Chicken
There is God in the garden here
among the hens and the trees,
tucked away almost perfectly
so that no one sees

that the Almighty has found a playground
where no one judges His skill
and all that happens to happen
is enfolded in His will.

There’s a sighing in the treetops
as the leaves refuse to sing.
There’s a hammock, uninhabited,
that is turned into a swing.

There is prayers on every corner
and an image of God in stone
as another created creature
stands naked, but not alone.

There are eyes on rocks in this garden
and shells on a piece of string.
There is plenty of God in the garden.
There is God behind every thing.

Sh’ma, the wind repeats it
Sh’ma, sh’ma Yisrael,
it is well with my soul in the garden,
and all is exceedingly well.

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Bread of Life

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I am the bread of life
enough for today
I am your bread for tomorrow
I’m here to stay
I am the bread that was broken,
the Lamb who was slain
I am the Victor, the King,
the flour, the grain.

Give me a little yeast
and a measure of time
such is the Kingdom of God
by descending, you’ll climb.
I am the bread that was broken
to make one loaf
out of the myriad nations.
Through death comes growth.

I am the bread of life
enough for your needs
I am food both for the hungry
and him who feeds.
I am the bread that was broken
to make the world whole.
I am the peace you receive
which abides in your soul.

I am the bread that was given,
I gave it myself
I gave it for all my disciples,
even the twelfth,
I poured out my life
like a cup of wine on the ground
and claimed back the dust that was lost
and declared it found.

I am the bread of life
enough for today
I am your bread forever,
the truth, the way.
I am the power of life
no one can destroy.
I am salvation,
abundantly full of joy.

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Love

Untitled

Love incarnate came to redeem His creation,
and evil rose like a towering wave of rage
against the Word that was with God from the foundation
and spoken over the waters at the dawn of the age.
Love spoke truth to power and grace to the humble
now He is quiet as insults are spat in His face.
A crown of thorns. A royal robe. Watch Him stumble
under the weight of a crossbeam He chose to embrace.

Love walked here among us and healed the broken.
Now He Himself is broken and crucified
and sometime that afternoon, the final word spoken,
Love breathed a laboured, triumphal breath – and died.
Love attracted and bound the furious hatred
of evil onto Himself and was swallowed by death.
But death could not hold a Love so eternal and sacred
and ripples of earthquakes began which haven’t stopped yet.

God did not hide His face from His Son as He died,
God was in Christ so that we might be reconciled.
Love is at work to teach us to truly live
and if He gave so much, what would He not give?
Love comes between you and evil when it clings to your soul.
and Christ who paid for your freedom is making you whole.
So pause and remember the message of bread and wine:
“I am the Shepherd who paid for your life with mine.”

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Act 5 of the Bible – Acts 1 v 1-11 

Fri 14 Aug Misha 6

As Jesus began His ministry, everyone was intently scanning the horizon for God’s promised Messiah, but most people did not recognise the image of the Messiah Jesus presented. Yet, somehow, a mere 20 years after Jesus’ death and resurrection, there are Christian churches dotted all around the Mediterranean. Amazingly, Paul’s letters to these churches were written as early as AD 50-55. Increasingly, people were persuaded. Jesus did not fit in the existing categories but caused the categories to be redefined around Him. The early church did that: They read Scripture afresh in the light of Jesus and let Him show them what their idea of God should be. At Pentecost, the Holy Spirit filled the disciples and they were changed forever. Filled with the Spirit of Jesus, they became part of God’s new creation and subjects in the Kingdom of Heaven. Theologians say the Kingdom of Heaven is ‘now and not yet’. As the apostles preached in several languages, the Holy Spirit illuminated Jesus and thousands were baptised. Something grew, not only in people’s hearts, but in full public view. At the Tower of Babel, because of their self-worship, people ended up divided. At Pentecost, in an act of un-Babel’ing, the Spirit begins to create unity as Christ builds His church. No manmade tower can ever compare to the magnificent splendour of this temple when finished.

God’s creative act can be seen through the lens of ‘purpose’ and ‘role’ and the cosmos as an immense temple. “Heaven is my throne, and the earth is my footstool”. The tabernacle, and later the temple(s) in Jerusalem were small models of the huge cosmic temple God created ‘in the beginning’. The temple was where God had chosen to dwell, in real a physical location on a geographical map with a real people. In this microcosmos, heaven and earth met. But when Jesus said, ‘Destroy this temple and I will raise it again in three days’, a new understanding of ‘temple’ was required. In Jesus’ ministry, heaven intersected with earth and the Kingdom came near, and with His death and resurrection, a new order began. Forgiven and thus, freed from our bondage to sin, we were free to serve God. No longer powerless but filled with the Spirit, through whom God dwells with His people, and not only with them, but within them. “If anyone is in Christ, they are a new creation.” Not metaphorically speaking, but in real terms. We really are changed. Our nature is wholly different to what it was, and our spirits are infused with His. We made new. Re-created.

Understanding God’s creative work as (also) functional, in this renewed creation we’d expect to find roles assigned that serve a purpose, order appearing and God’s image-bearers becoming, in ways that are new, yet recognisable, more like God. We would expect to see things working. And that is exactly what happens. The gifts of the Spirit are given for the benefit of the church. So is the fruit. It happens gradually as the Spirit works in the hearts and in the community of believers. Lies fade; trust in God is restored. Selfishness yields to self-giving love. Humility wins over pride. Christ is increasingly Lord in all areas of personal and church life. When we say Christ is Lord, we profess that we are not, nor others’ opinion, the majority vote, the media, or our current culture… There is no room for idolatry in the Kingdom. The King is king there.

So, what is the purpose for which Christ builds His church? My suggestion is that our role is the same and yet different from the one we were given at the (first) creation. Recall it? “Multiply, steward, and be image-bearers.” All advance the Kingdom (God’s reign), and thus glorify God. The Great Commission tells us to ‘make disciples of all nations.’ That is how God’s new creation multiplies. We steward when we value people and the creation we live in. We are increasingly image-bearers and light-bringers when we allow the Holy Spirit to form us into the image and the body of Christ. Heaven meets with earth as we continue Jesus mission in small almost unseen ways. When we share our testimony, give someone a drink of water, and decide to forgive. When we express boundaries with kindness. Dance in the rain. Use less plastic and more of our talent. When we trust God enough to take a day off. When the church is of one mind and heart and gets along, we reflect God’s character. Christ is building His church to represent Him. As temples of the Holy Spirit we are plugged into His power and the light of hope can be switched on in a dark world.

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Act 4 of the Bible – Isaiah 49 v 5-23  

Thu Aug 13 Misha 5

When Jesus of Nazareth looked out over the crowd before Him and proclaimed: “You are the light of the world”, it wasn’t His words as much as the people to whom He said them that shocked people. Not the religious elite, but the downtrodden, poor, and sick were the apple of God’s eye and His humble witnesses. “A city set on a hill cannot be hidden”. When He said, “I am the light of the world”, it wasn’t the words… Similar words had been written centuries ago in Isaiah’s prophecy about the Servant who would finally restore Israel, and be a light to the nations (Isaiah 49). It was Jesus’ interpretation of the Kingdom of God which startled a nation waiting on tiptoe for the fulfilment of God’s promises which they knew and lived in. He claimed to be the One all Israel’s past history had pointed to in a big unified story – the King who would usher in the new promised kingdom where God would rule with peace, blessing, favour, wellbeing, health and dwell again with His people. Good news for everyone – liberation, restoration, reconciliation. A new exodus and a new, complete return from exile. Remarkably, Jesus claimed that “the suffering servant” was central to this. These pictures conflicted so much that the minds of even His closest disciples boggled at this talk of suffering. The two images were so incompatible that the whole thing was simply impossible to grasp.

The disciples roughly understood the Messiah part. They knew the entire backstory and lived it, sang it, and celebrated the festivals. Creator God enthroned. The whole universe full of His glory. Promises to Abraham. Freedom from slavery. God revealed Himself to Moses in a cloud and gave the law. God’s manifest glory at Solomon’s temple as a cloud which left again. When Jesus was transfigured before three of His disciples in a cloud, these events, although terrifying, had something familiar about them. Something glorious and messianic – God approving His king. This other talk about suffering jarred. The closer they got to Jerusalem on that last journey, the more frequent became Jesus’ reminders that this really was the plan. He must be betrayed, mocked, flogged, and crucified. On the third day, He would be raised to life. (Matt 20 v 17-19).

And that is exactly how it happened. Evil had been gathering around Jesus, tensions building, darkness brewing. He has aroused evil and drawn it to Himself. Jesus, on His knees in a dark garden, sweating blood, pleads with God that if there is another way… In His deep anguish, He prays in complete surrender to God, “Not my will, but yours.” Jesus does the impossible and puts the fruit of autonomy back on the tree as He chooses the cross. God’s Messiah, His Suffering Servant is lifted up, enthroned on an instrument of torture and crowned with thorns. Set on a hill, the Light of the world has nothing to hide behind. Naked and exposed, Immanuel (God-with-us) takes upon Himself all our guilt, shame, sin, brokenness, infirmity. In Jesus, God shows what love looks like: He stays. Jesus could have ended His suffering and come down from the cross, but God’s promise to redeem His people is a new covenant, made to last in the power of love.

In the temple of Jesus’ body, heaven meets with earth. He is the perfect Son with whom God is pleased. God is intensely present with His people as the Father receives the sacrifice of the Son: His Spirit, given freely, fully surrendered in love. God’s glory is as manifest as we have ever seen it, revealed, yet strangely hidden in plain view. God was in Christ, reconciling the world to Himself. Something is fundamentally different afterwards. God gives meaning to Jesus’ meaningless suffering. As God accepts Jesus’ work on the cross, peace with God becomes possible. Jesus said: “It is finished”. He was speaking the truth. We are free.

At the resurrection, God’s new creation begins with Christ. One day, it will be like the 7th day of creation. God will be king, reigning in shalom-peace, unopposed, active in love. We will be like Christ, with glorious new bodies, undivided hearts, and pure spirits, enfolded in that same loving peace, breathing that same Spirit. Until then, the church must carry Jesus to the world, and preach the good news, heal, serve, and make whole the broken. Disciples in every generation look around at each other and asked: “How can we even begin to do this? We’re just people.” The answer is, by becoming and remaining plugged into God.

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Act 3, Scene 2 – Ezekiel 36 v 12-28 

Wed Aug 12 Misha 4

When Jesus broke bread on His last night with the disciples, they were celebrating Passover together – the yearly feast celebrating the great liberation from 400 years of slavery in Egypt. The Israelites had done nothing to deserve this hardship; the political climate had simply changed, and the new Pharaohs did not know or trust these incomers. The Exodus commemorated their freedom from unfair oppression.

Yesterday, we left the Israelites in the desert at the foot of a mountain where God had come to meet with them in a cloud, giving the law, along with instructions about a special tent and an ark to keep the tablets. A newly founded nation with a mission for God, they entered the Promised Land, where for a while they were led by a series of judges, such as Joshua, Deborah, Samson and Samuel. As the Israelites looked around to the other nations, they demanded a king instead. Despite warnings about taxes and other burdens a king would place on them, they persisted, so Saul was made king. It wasn’t long before Saul decided to blatantly ignore God’s instructions. Samuel was sent to anoint David who waited years to become king. During the reign of David, and initially his son Solomon, the Jews thrived. A glorious temple of stone was built in which sacrifices could be made and (as an echo of the great temple of creation), heaven met with earth. This was where God dwelled, and His presence lingered with humanity.

Not long after, things went downhill. Civil war broke out and the country was split into two branches. In the Northern Kingdom, ‘Israel’, after a series of cruel and idolatrous kings, disaster strikes in BC 721. The Assyrian Empire wipes out anything that resembles a functioning kingdom and one of the two branches disappears. The few scattered people left of the 10 northern tribes in the area later called Samaria began intermarrying and customs changed. In the Southern Kingdom, ‘Judah’, things are not a great deal better. Worship of Baal and other gods comes and goes. In BC 587, Nebuchadnezzar destroys the temple in Jerusalem and the elite especially is exiled. This is clearly seen as punishment for sin and disobedience. Some of you might remember Ezekiel’s vision of the glory of God upping and leaving the temple prior to its destruction (Ezekiel 10). God no longer dwelled with His people, who have rejected Him and unplugged from God as much as they could. There is a deep sense among prophets and people alike of shame, terror, regret and repentance. They have failed to be the people God made them to be – and they have done so in plain view of the people they were meant to witness to. But God promises to restore them. There is hope.

As the Babylonian empire falls to the Persians, the exiles are allowed to return. The first temple is gone, but after a few false starts, a second temple is built around BC 516. The new temple leads to rejoicing as it is again possible for God’s presence to dwell with humans but among the returning exiles, a deep grief lingers along with a sense that the exile is not yet over. They are back, but it’s not like before. The new temple is nothing compared to the original one. It is discussed whether God’s glory has returned to the new temple or not. Is God fully back with us? In the passage from Ezekiel which we’ve read today, God promises to restore His people, yet it was plain to everyone at the time, this promise had not yet been fully realised. There’s no real peace neither without nor within. A period of around 400 years after the return from exile is not described in the Bible but includes Greek occupation, before eventually, Rome invades Judea.

The (even at that time) old prophecies by Isaiah especially begin to give rise to new thoughts about the role of God’s people in their surrounding world. Suffering is now a central part of Jewish understanding of themselves and of God. Passover, previously simply a liberation feast, takes on additional meanings including thoughts about sin and forgiveness normally reserved for Atonement Day. There is a lot of debate among rabbis about this shift, and how to understand the ‘suffering servant’ passages in Isaiah. As an Ethiopian eunuch would ask many years later when reading Isaiah 53: Is the prophet talking about himself or someone else? (Acts 8 v 34).

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Act 3, Scene 1 of the Bible – Exodus 19 v 1-8           

Tue Aug 11 Misha 3

My placement supervisor referred to it as ‘The Big Story of the Bible’, this unfolding narrative of God’s great plan from creation to the day when God makes everything new. When we tell that story, a large chunk of the story can sometimes seem almost ‘unnecessary’ to us: The story of Israel. Sometimes, apart from finding a wealth of great Sunday school stories in the Old Testament, we aren’t quite sure what to make of it. To make matters more complicated, the books of the Bible aren’t ordered chronologically, so picturing a timeline and how events unfurled requires a bit of work. Today, we’ll make try to get that overview.

You will remember that we left Adam and Eve around the time when the dark consequences of their disobedience dawned on them. Evicted from the garden it wasn’t long before the world’s first murder took place as Cain killed his brother Abel. Within a few generations, things had become so bad that God decided to completely remodel creation in a giant flood. Man’s pride and desire for autonomy led to some attempts at ‘self-worship’ at the tower of Babel, so God confused their languages. Later on, God calls Abraham and gives him the promise. A couple of generations later, a set of twin brothers, Esau and Jacob, are born. The younger cheats the older out of his birth right with the help of his mother and a bowl of lentil soup. In the next generation, a father’s favouritism leads a group of jealous brothers to sell their brother into slavery in Egypt, while claiming he has been killed by wild animals. Not a lot of ‘shalom’ here. After many trials, Joseph, ready for his place in history, becomes an Egyptian official whose gift of administration saves many people from death during a famine. After a remarkable scene of reunion and forgiveness, the whole family comes to live in Egypt. Not long after, however, the political climate changes and the Israelites become slaves. Moses is born and placed in a basket in the river Nile as his mother can’t bring herself to follow the command that all male infants must be killed. He is raised as an Egyptian prince and many years later, after an anything-but-great start to his relationship with his own people, he leads them out of Egypt in the Exodus and receives the Law on stone tablets. As some say, it was the first ever download from ‘the cloud’.

In all these instances, what is really going on underneath the surface is that God is deepening His covenant with humankind, and later specifically with the people of Israel. The promise to Adam and Eve at creation that they are free to multiply and steward creation and later, that the snake’s head will be crushed. The promise to Noah and all of creation symbolised by the rainbow that never again will there be such a flood. The promises to Abraham that his descendants will be as numerous as the stars of the sky, possess lands and become great nations are all given by God as gifts, as grace bestowed on His servant, Abraham. And then, in God’s covenant with Moses and the Israelite people at Mount Sinai, God vows to take Israel as His treasured possession if they will keep His commandments. The Israelites accept the offer, and God speaks the words that make them a holy nation and a kingdom of priests. God also gives them a sign, with a deep meaning: The Sabbath is a reminder of God’s deep shalom-peace and His world order. (Ex 31 v 12-17).

Today’s reading could look like God simply giving the Israelites a privileged status. Sadly at times, it has been the cause of unhealthy pride, not healthy humility. It’s a huge privilege to be God’s chosen people, but it comes with enormous responsibility and happens due to God’s grace, not human achievement. Unplug God, and pooff!  By divine decree, God made a nation of those who were not a nation. God didn’t look around for the largest nation, not even for the smallest one. He looked around and saw a man, Abraham, whose wife couldn’t have children and decided that those two together would do nicely as the starting point for God’s own people. Plugged into God, all things are possible. A few centuries later, a group of people become a holy nation; it comes into being as God gives it its purpose: To stand out from the crowd in order to lead people into an encounter with God, fulfilling their role as a kingdom of priests whose function is to facilitate those divine encounters and be an example. With God, nothing truly exists until it begins working and fulfils its role in God’s order. Will this new nation succeed in doing that? Will we?

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Act 2 of the Bible  – Genesis 3

Mon 10 Aug Misha 2

The first human beings got on with life in perfect peace. Every day was like Sunday (unless you’re a minister, in which case, pick another day and keep it holy). It was like Sabbath, a day of rest. A bit of gardening (no weeding required), some name-calling: (“You’re a cow! Giraffe! We’ll call you a butterfly, I think”). Other gentle activities: Talking to friends. Sharing food. They took walks, talked to God, and reflected His character perfectly. These amazing image-bearers exercised their delegated authority in the spirit God had shown them and probably began exploring what ‘multiply’ meant. Peace, wellbeing, and harmony reigned. Shalom reigned. God reigned. Everything, humans included, functioned as intended.

And then, a niggling little voice somewhere in the long grass at the back of someone’s mind, suggesting that perhaps God’s order could be improved just a tiny bit by adding a very small improvement: Autonomy. Complete freedom to do whatever came to mind whenever it came to mind. Independence. Liberty!

And so, the image-bearers of God’s creation reached out for the fruit of autonomy. The moment they did, they realised there was no such thing as independence. The very act of creation had been putting things in relationship to each other, as God constructed the temple of creation in which He met with human beings. Heaven kissed earth here. No barriers, no division, no aging, just shalom. Now the very glue of inter-relationship that had held things together so perfectly, the right-being that had made things work so effortlessly was torn. Everything jarred and was out of kilter. If creation is not a material event but an event in which things are given their proper roles and put in relationships that work, it’s easy to understand why when God’s decrees about order are not respected, death enters the picture. A slow decay. An un-creation. A broken mirror. Unplugging from God, the source of life, is like unplugging creation at the mains. Pooff.

Thank God, despite our fatal decision to pull the plug, He doesn’t give up on us but keeps pouring love and life into creation to sustain it. God has a plan to redeem His us which we’ll explore over the next few days.

Nevertheless, as a result of the fall, everything now groans. Creation groans. Women in labour groan. Farmers groan as suddenly an orderly garden without weeds becomes a field of thorns, thistles, and toil. Things become heavy, work is tiring, people get old. Loneliness, illness, and grief make us groan. We groan when we can’t have what we crave for, and when we yearn for things we know we shouldn’t want in the first place. We groan when we realise, we got it wrong despite our best intentions. We groan as we realise our intentions weren’t that good after all, come to think of it. The Holy Spirit groans too within us as God continues His lifegiving work. Romans 8 v 26 says: In the same way the Spirit also helps our weakness; for we do not know how to pray as we should, but the Spirit Himself intercedes for us with groanings too deep for words. God’s rule is no longer an effortless Sunday walk in the park. There is opposition, strife, sin. Everything is out of joint and the glorious order of God’s reign is no longer full of shalom.

Allow me to return to the verse above for a moment – Romans 8 v 26. In the Greek, the word Paul uses for ‘intercede’ is a composite word made up of two parts: “for the benefit of someone” and “to align with”. We are used to hearing that the Holy Spirit is our Advocate, the one who comes alongside us. But the work of the Holy Spirit is also to act as a ‘connector’, restoring our lost relationship with God and bringing us back into alignment with His will for our benefit. You could say that the Holy Spirit works to plug us more securely back into God. One possible way of expressing the verse above is like this: In the same way, the Spirit helps us in our frail condition; for we are oblivious to what we ought to desire, but the Spirit Himself, groaning and straining in ways too baffling for words, seeks to bring us back into alignment with God’s purpose. The fall happened as Adam and Eve lost sight of what they ought to want, namely ‘God’s good, pleasing and perfect will’. As they opted for another solution that was really no solution at all, the perfect reflection of God’s image in them was shattered. Can it ever be restored? How?

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Act 1 of the Bible – Genesis 1 v1 – 2 v3

Creation-of-the-world-2100x1200

It won’t be the first time we read Genesis 1 together, but this might be a different interpretation than most of us are used to. These perspectives don’t need to conflict, however. Rather, I would say these thoughts complement each other. In 2009, John Walton published a book, ‘The Lost World of Genesis One’, and here, I want to share the main idea with you as a starting point for a small series of ‘Thoughts for the Day’.

John Walton proposes that what’s going on in Genesis 1, is that God organises an enormous temple, the entire cosmos, as a place for God to be enthroned. In our Western world of today we are very used to thinking about matter and material things. For us, the story of Genesis is often a story of ‘matter’. What did God create? What did He create it from? When kids get to school, they have already absorbed this ‘what is real is what I can touch’ way of thinking as the only option. Our culture often questions whether things exist if they are not tangible; a lot of people nowadays struggle with the idea of an invisible God who acts.

For the ancient people to whom this text was first written, this sort of doubt would have been alien. It was obvious to them that without the sustaining power of God, nothing could exist. If you unplug God at the mains, so to speak, poooff, everything else would be gone too. The thought of splitting things up into ‘the real tangible stuff’ and the ‘fluffy God stuff’ was inconceivable. Their worldview was not ‘material’ but rather ‘functional’: Something exists when it is carrying out a purpose. For people in this world, creation happened when God spoke order and purpose over the unproductive and chaotic waters and decreed what was to be the new order: A period of light (day), followed by darkness (night) to begin time. A weather system around the edges, expressed in ways that would make sense to the readers. A place for food to grow on the earth. Then after these fundamental functions had been put in place, God told the lights in the sky to function as indicators of time. Then the birds and fish given the purpose of multiplying. And animals on the earth. It was ordered this way to be a perfect home for human beings who were given additional purposes apart from multiplying – namely to steward and to carry God’s image. All this had been put in place, it worked according to plan, it functioned so it was, and it was very good. Once all the ‘doing’ and ‘making’ was done, on the 7th day, God rested but not in the sense we’re used to thinking.

God rests by effortlessly exercising His reign over creation. God’s activity without opposition is ‘rest’. There was no trouble, so God reigned in shalom/peace. Authority and power would go out from Him to smoothly keep things going as they were meant, to benefit the people He had entrusted to co-rule with Him. If we think of every day of the 7-day week being a day of creation of purpose, function, role, meaning, order, the 7th day suddenly becomes the most glorious day of them, as this is where God is enthroned. Only as the Creator God sits down in His enormous temple, does creation find its true purpose. Creation is not fully created until that moment when God makes this huge cosmos His temple, His home, His dwelling-place. It is a blessed day of going from the work of ordering and creating to the work of exercising His rule in peace.

God wants to be understood. He is eager to reveal Himself, and so He speaks in images we can at least begin to fathom although sometimes the mind still boggles. In a culture where temples were universally seen as dwelling places of the divine, places where heaven came to rule over earth and needy deities were served by humans, of course God would speak in familiar language. But what God says in that language is shocking! 3 points: 1. That unlike what other cultures believed at the time, people are not there to meet God’s needs. The whole creation is optimised for human beings and God’s care for us is built into the very order of creation.  2. Other temples have picture of God at the centre. God’s massive temple has us as His image-bearers and co-rulers. 3. That God fills this entire cosmic temple of creation with His glory. On day 8, 9, 10, 11…, God is still resting with us, actively and peacefully going about the business of being God, ruling, decreeing, giving life, keeping things working. So far, so very good. Will it stay that way?                      -Misha

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